let me run through the shitshow that has been March 27th, 2012

  • woke up in a huff
  • all the client emails
  • huge huge huge event tonight
  • printing all the trip info
  • charging all the cameras
  • not eating a one damn thing
  • eyes apparently swollen for no reason
  • packing packing packing
  • OH WAIT IT’S GONNA RAIN THE ENTIRE TIME
  • email from Iberia
  • MADRID IS ON STRIKE
  • FLIGHTS ARE CHANGED
  • sure, I’ll hit confirm bc I’m too stressed to read the entire fucking email
  • TRIP CUT A WHOLE DAY SHORT
  • customer service call
  • sorry bro go fly through London instead
  • MELTDOWN
  • boyfriend says no biggie, let’s do London
  • OH OK LET ME CALL BACK
  • ON HOLD FOREVER
  • hey, where’s my passport?
  • CAN’T FIND MY PASSPORT
  • interns are applying … now?!
  • you want to offer me a job … now?!
  • SUITCASE IS OVERPACKED
  • I’m fucking starving
  • no time to slow down
  • this is going to end horrendously

my Brooklyn story this week

I’ve taken just about every train and been to every Brooklyn neighborhood I thought I’d never see.

I’ve also spent entirely WAY too long riding said trains to see said neighborhoods.

and not by choice.

and for those of you who are thinking of moving here and are like “AWESOME I GET TO RIDE SUBWAYS?! AND DON’T NEED A CAR?!” - shut up. because it’s not awesome. it’s stupid to go to a neighborhood that would be a 13min car ride but instead is a 2hr RT by subway, and when you look on the map it’s a basic zigzag.

but hey, at least I got to learn a new subway line, right!

hear me out

I know I’m going around advocating this whole HEY BE A FREELANCER AND START YOUR OWN COMPANY thing but when you sign into your bank account and there $0 in your checking, a credit card bill over $1000 and $85 in your savings, MAYBE its time to rethink priorities here, and kick your clients in the balls.

so ya know, I think it’s time I settle for a part-time job and sacrifice sleeping in for a bit so I can actually afford to live a little.

A generation ago, despite high unemployment, it was almost unheard of to intern after graduation. But college students today have become so comfortable — and employers so enamored — with the concept of the no pay/low pay internship undertaken for college credit or in lieu of a summer job that it has spilled over into the entry-level job market. The post-graduate internship has, in many cases, replaced the entry level job, which is creating a ripple effect across the entire marketplace. The fact is, the job market has been flooded with a pool of highly educated and very cheap labor. Then we should step back and ask what happens to the job market when a highly educated segment of the population makes itself available to work for little or no pay. How much of a contributing factor to current unemployment is the fact that corporate America is capitalizing on the large group of well-educated, often debt-straddled job seekers willing — or systemically forced — to “intern” before they can get “real” jobs? And what happens to those who simply can’t afford to play the game? This phenomenon is creating a sociological exclusion — a restrictive financial gate — for lower and middle-income parents and their newly graduated children. If the corporate climate is such that a segment of highly educated, upper middle class, entry-level workers are willing to work for free or a stipend in order to be competitively qualified for a “real” job down the road, then how can the rest of the workforce compete to put food on the table, pay down debt and support themselves and their families?